Interpreter for deaf


The registry of Interpreters for the Deaf is a national membership organization of professionals who provide sign language interpreting/transliterating services for deaf and hard of hearing persons. It was established in 1964 and incorporated in 1972. It advocates for the increased quality, qualification, and quantity of interpreters through the services. The deaf interpreter-training certificate is a six-quarter program that prepares students to work as interpreters for deaf consumers with special needs and deaf blind consumers. The curriculum includes skills classes and practicums. The program is designed to prepare individuals to work as deaf interpreters in areas such as colleges, public schools or as freelance interpreters. The curriculum provides students a background that prepares them to enter work in human services areas such as vocational rehabilitation, early childhood education, and social and mental health agencies. Graduates may also find employment in theaters, libraries, companies, museums, or any other public or private arenas in which deaf and hearing people interact.

Objective

The primary importance is given on the development, strengthening, and enhancement of a network of professional interpreters. It aims to promote the development and expansion of quality interpreting/transliterating services available to persons who are deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing. It encourages the recruitment and training of professionals in interpreting and transliterating. It promotes the highest standards in the interpreting and transliterating profession. It offers a forum for professional interpreters/transliterators for exchange of ideas, opinions, and information concerning interpreting. It also provides with an opportunity for training in order to attain, maintain and upgrade qualifications for interpreters/transliterators. It also provides a support to the legislative interests and concerns of the organization. It also provides with the means foe dissemination and exchange of information.

Who needs interpreters and who should provide it?

Federal law and/or State law generally require an interpreter to be provided when it is necessary to ensure effective communication for a deaf or hard of hearing person, i.e. as effective as it would be between people who hear. Employers--all private employers with over 15 employees, state and local government and federally funded private employers must provide an interpreter when it is necessary for effective communication unless it would cause an undue burden.

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